Last updated on June 1, 2018 by Rob Mayzes

Today you’ll learn how to use 5 simple reverb and delay techniques to make your mixes more exciting, more fun, and more unique.

By using effects creatively, and combining them with a little automation, you can make mixing way more enjoyable, and produce better results.

In fact, I’d go as far to say that this is one of my favorite parts of mixing!

 

Today you’ll learn how to use four simple reverb and delay techniques to make your mixes more exciting, more fun and more unique.

By using effects creatively and combining them with a little automation you can make mixing way more enjoyable and produce better results, and in fact I’d go as far to say that this is one of my favorite parts of mixing.

So, keep watching and as ever don’t forget to download the free effects cheat sheet.

Rob here from Musician on a Mission hope you’re having a great day. Today you’ll learn how to use five simple reverb and delay techniques to make your mixes more exciting, more fun, and more unique.

By using effects creatively and combining them with a little automation you can make mixing way more enjoyable and produce better results, and in fact I’d go as far to say that this is one of my favorite parts of mixing.

So, keep watching and as ever don’t forget to download the free effects cheat sheet.

Rob here from a Musician on a Mission hope you’re having a great day. So, here are the five reverb and delay techniques you’re going to learn in this video; reverb throws, sub-reverb throws, delay throws, atmospheric reverb and reverse reverb.

So, let’s start with reverb throws and rather than explain what it is it’s easier just to show you.

So, here in this chart we’ve got a bit of an empty part. It’s the space between the chorus and a verse. There’s not much going on, so we can try and fill this space with some effects. Let’s have a listen first.

So we already have a bit of a delay throw in there I’m going to come back to that later, but this could have a lot more going on in this space.

We could make it much more exciting and by using the last word of the vocal here we can manipulate that with some reverb to try and fill this space.

So, let’s start by just creating a reverb sound that we want and I’m just going to loop this section here and we can just do this on the actual channel itself. So, we’ll load up a reverb.

Let’s just go for Valhalla Room and let’s try and create something really interesting. First we want something that’s going to be quite long to fill that space, but let’s see if we can make it a bit different too.

So, first we want to make sure get the mix right, because we don’t want this to be 100% wet. It’s not on a buss and then a bit of pre-delay that’s fine. Decay time we want to be quite long. Let’s try something around 10 seconds, get into 10 seconds and let’s just play around with these other settings.

That’s cool. That kind of sounds like a **** [unclear 00:05:10].

So, that sounds really cool. It almost has like a rhythm to it.

But at the moment it’s a bit over the top, so let’s try reducing that mix.

Because it’s interacting with the delay throw that we’re going to come back to later that’s what’s giving it that rhythm. But of course we don’t want this on the whole verse or the next verse.

So, what we need to do is go into automation. In the Logic just hit A, then we’re going to go to Valhalla Room and we’re just going to automate the bypass, which we should have somewhere here. It looks like we don’t have a bypass and instead let’s just use mix.

So that’s the level that we had to add for this actual word, but we only want it on that last word so we can just reduce the wet to dry mix there and here, and now the reverb is only going to come in for that last word.

That sounds like it comes in a little early, so let’s try moving that back a bit.

And it sounds a bit unnatural, so let’s turn it down a bit.

So, there we go. Reverb throw and it’s called a throw because we just throwing the vocal to a reverb for one word, and then it comes back out.

So, now let’s move onto the next type of throw which is a sub-reverb throw.

Now, I class this as something different, because it has quite a different tonal impact and different effects on the mix. This reverb is quite bright and it’s also quite noticeable, but by really shaping that reverb and making it really low pitched – and that’s why I call it sub-reverb, because we can try boosting the lows we can give a very different tonal characteristic.

So, let’s just try doing it straight on this vocal and what we’re going to do is just add an EQ before it. I’m going to cut all the highs out and we’re also going to trim the lows to make sure it doesn’t get too much, and then we’re going to boost the sub frequencies quite aggressively around 60 Hz something like that and let’s taper this off and again make sure this is nice and steep. And now listen to how this sounds. It’s completely different.

Of course, we’re going to have to automate this, so let’s do that now. So, same thing.

So, we just going to go to channel EQ this time and now we just need to automate so in comes in that last word. So, we go to channel EQ, and then we can go to – and then we just need to automate that, so in comes-on on the last word and let’s do something with that different here. Let’s actually just *** [unclear 00:09:52] and let’s write it in.

No, I fucked up this isn’t going to work. So, let’s go back to that.

So, I explained what a sub-reverb throw is, and then now I’m going to show *** [inaudible 00:10:41]

So, to do this we actually going to have to load up a new channel, so let’s start a new Aux and let’s put in on the end here, and then let’s bring that back into this view so you could just turn on automation and that will punch it up here.

So, input buss 30 and let’s go to sub – we we’ve already got the kind of reverb sound that we want, so that we could just move that across to here instead, and then the difference is we’re going to add reverb before the EQ.

We’re going to really tidy up this low-end, so we’re going to cutout all the highs, and then we’re going to boost quite aggressively in this sub-range, so let’s use bell boost around here and that’s why we want to taper off those lows. This is going to really change the tone of the reverb.

Now, what we’re going to have to do is change the way we were automating it, and we’re going to have to automate the send instead. So, now we go to Main and we can go to – it’s change here – fucked up, fucked up.

So now to set this up we’re going to have to approach it a little bit different here. We’re going to need to do it on a different channel, so let’s just load up a new send and then we’re going to go to mix view and in Logic we just have to turn on automation to bring that back into our project view right here and we can go to sub-reverb.

We’ve already dialed in our reverb, so we can copy that across, and then what we’re going to do differently is add EQ beforehand. We’re going to really aggressively boost the lows here to really bring out a thick, heavy drenched reverb sound that’s very low and full, but we don’t want to make it over the top in the low-end so we’re going to cut all of that out and we’re going to remove all the top-end as well to give it a really deep effects sound, and just listen to how different this sound is.

So, first we just need to automate that send so we can go to Main, Sub-reverb, and then it’s done here and we just want to bring it up for this one word here. So, it’s muted then it’s unmuted. We can adjust the volume.

We can go around mute it, unmute it.

So, let’s listen to this in solo. So, this is how the sub-reverb sounds on its own.

Now, let’s bring the wetness up.

So, it has a very different characteristic.

And what it tends to do is really add a lot of thickness to a certain section. Works really well on tones as well.

Now, let’s listen to it in the context of the mix.

And let’s try fading in a little bit with some volume automation.

I think you can even increase the room size a bit.

So, it’s more subtle. You have to be careful with this, because sometimes it sounds a bit odd because the vocal obviously is quite full and bright, and then this reverb throw is very dark so you have to kind of blend them together.

But this works well on all kinds of instruments just like the reverb throw. You can use this on anything not just vocals.

We tend to use effect throws to make some vocals, because they’re the focal point for the listener but if you have an empty section that hasn’t got vocals before you can try adding this to a piano part, maybe you could try adding this to a drum hit. It works really well on drum hits because they don’t have tonal elements so it sounds a bit more natural on drum hits.

But it’s a great trick to try if you want to add interest and depth in this kind of epic quality to emptier sections.

Now, let’s move onto the next type of throw which is delay throws. So, you’ve already heard this going on and I’m just show you and explain how – so you would have heard this going on in the background a little bit but now I want to show you how we’re doing it. So, we’ve got the vocal here and it’s actually been sent to a lead vocal channel, so I am automating this channel with the volume so that we’ve got a nice consistent level.

But then I’m applying compression on another channel, so the lead vocal is going from here output buss 1, buss 1 coming into this channel and the reasoning behind that is so that the automation is before the compression so the level going into the compressor is nice and even.

If you want to learn more about that checkout my video called the Vocal Automation Trick.

But what I’m going to do here is just show you how this has been automated. So, we’ve got the send-24.

If you want to learn more about that checkout our video called Vocal Automation Trick, because what I’m showing you here is the delay and we’re going to be focusing on this send here, which is send-25 and over here we can see mono-delay.

Because what we’re going to talk about now is this mono-delay send which is send-26 and on input-26 you can see mono-delay. We’ve got – I’m using Manny Marroquin Delay and it’s just timed to a beat, a quarter note and let’s actually listen to how this sounds in solo.

So, it’s just time to quarter note. We’ve got a bit of reverb on it, a bit of phasing that’s why I love this plug-in, because it’s really easy just to make those delays a bit more interesting. And then the important thing here is that the send has been automated, so you can see at the end of each phrase of this verse the send goes up quite a lot by 7dBs almost and there’s still a little bit of delay tucked in underneath the first few notes then after that we’re bringing it up to fill this gap, and in the context of the mix that just adds quite a lot of interest to that section, those gaps between the phrases.

So, it’s really easy to do. As you’ve already seen we just need to automate that send level and just bring it up for those boring bits between phrases on the vocal and this is a really common technique.

So, that’s it for throws and now I want to talk about two different types of reverbs. One of them being atmospheric reverb, and then the next one we’re going to talk about is reverse reverb.

Now, I use the term atmospheric reverb to describe the use of reverb that isn’t just to create depth, so quite often in a mix we’re using a reverb buss or some kind of reverb with varying amounts of sends from different instruments to get a blend and this is called the Room Reverb that’s what I would call it anyway, so we can actually listen to how that sounds in this track.

And that’s how we create that front to back image. The vocal is front and sends that hasn’t got much reverb on it, and then snare and some of the these melodic parts have got a bit more reverb on them to create depth, and also to add some width to the mix in this case I’m using the stereo reverb.

But sometimes you want to use reverb much more creatively.

Sometimes you want to drench the vocal in reverb or you want to drench guitars in reverb, and that’s absolutely fine.

When you’re using reverb as a noticeable effect then go crazy with it. Do what works for the track if that’s the kind of ambient atmospheric sound you’re going for and in this track I actually ended up using that kind of effects on the guitars at the end.

There’s kind of this dreamy guitar part, there’s two of them actually and let’s have a listen to those.

So, these two parts here dream entering to. Let’s just solo them first of all with no reverb so you can just hear what originally we’re working with, so we get rid of – I’ve got Valhalla Room and I’ve also got Logics, see over what the – let’s have a listen.

So, already there’s quite a bit of reverb on them. I’m adding reverb in bias effects and it’s just kind of an Arpeggiated chord, and then I duplicated it and pitched it down to the left to create this kind of stereo sound.

So, we’ve already got reverb there, but you can clearly hear the separation between the notes. You can hear each note being picked.

But then when we bring in first of all still reverb with 100% wetness and a big room size.

It changes from distinct picking into just this kind of mesh of sound, then if we add another reverb this time Valhalla again 100% wet and quite a large room.

Now, it sounds more like a synth or a pad something like that, so we’re just creating this really heavy ambient sound and we’re doing the same in the left here with this other part. It’s just pitch shift it down a bit.

Now, I like to use this quite a lot in choruses. It’s a great way to just pad out a chorus and what we’re doing here is just padding out the very last outro chorus.

So, pretty simple just heavy reverb and feel free to play around with that. It works quite well on vocals too if you want a really epic vocal sound we can just add reverb directly to the vocal and just drench it.

If you do that I recommend you use some kind of pre-delay that’s going to help to keep the reverb separate from the vocal without losing to too much and just play around with the tone of the reverb. It’s obviously going to have quite a bit impact on the tone of the vocal if it’s really bright reverb.

If it’s a really bright reverb it’s going to make the vocal sound brighter. If it’s really dark reverb the vocal will sound darker.

So, feel free to play around with that just get creative with it and normally this will come in quite earlier on in the production if this is the kind of sound you’re going for and you yourself will know that then you want to start playing around with reverb early on because it becomes part of the song, part of the production as opposed to just a mixing tool.

So, there you go five easy ways to make your mixes unique using reverb and delay.

Now, we covered a lot here and of course there’s a lot more to reverb and delay not just using throws but actually dialing in these effects.

So, I’ve put together a free effects cheat sheet that will help you to get reverb and delay right every single time, so you can make your mixes sound more professional.

And once you grab that I want to hear from you. Do you use any of these throw effects? And once you’ve grabbed I want to hear – and then I want to hear from you – and then I want to hear from you do you use any of these throws?

And then I want to hear from you leave a comment below and let me know.

Have you ever used heavy effects before? Yes or no?

And then I want to hear from you have you – and then I want to hear from you do you heavily rely on effects when you’re mixing?

Just comment below saying yes I use a lot of effects or no I don’t use a lot of effects, and then tell us why or tell us some of your favorite tips.

So, that’s all from me I’ll see you next week, and remember Create Regardless.

 

Audio professional, musician and founder of Musician on a Mission.

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